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Actress Kirsten Dunst faced the left's wrath this week after she made these comments supporting traditional gender roles:

“I feel like the feminine has been a little undervalued. We all have to get our own jobs and make our own money, but staying at home, nurturing, being the mother, cooking – it’s a valuable thing my mum created. And sometimes, you need your knight in shining armour. I’m sorry. You need a man to be a man and a woman to be a woman. That’s why relationships work…”

What's bizarre is that to many of us, these words might not seem that controversial.

It's not like she's saying women shouldn't work or that women who aren't domestic are bad moms. Rather, she is saying that being feminine and nurturing is not such a horrible thing and can bring a lot of value to the relationship.

What's even more bizarre is the left's response. You'd have thought the sky was falling or something:

  • Jezebel writer Erin Gloria Ryan stated, “Kirsten Dunst is not paid to write gender theory so it shouldn’t surprise anyone that she’s kind of dumb about it."
  • Elle Magazine tweeted that Dunst “has some funny ideas about what a relationship should be like.”
  • Colleen Nika at Refinery29 wrote, “Kirsten Dunst has shared her thoughts on gender roles in a relationship — and we're kind of wishing she hadn't.”
  • Writer Ariane Sommer bashed it as “regressing to a 1950s archetype of womanhood.”
  • Uproxx called her “an insufferable person” who “thinks that women should know their place is in the home.”
  • Finally, beauty website The Gloss called her interview “messed up.”

When it comes to gender roles, the key is that different approaches work for different people (and families). True equality is a woman living her own life how she chooses in freedom from coercion. Those women who complain of men being domineering and oppressive also tend to be in favor a huge, controlling state. That's ideologically incoherent.

If a woman wants to stay at home all day and clean house and cook for her family, so be it. If she's more of the career type, that's fine too. Personally, I've found that I (and most of my female friends) do not fill one of these roles or the other, but rather a combination of the two.

Those who were so quick to condemn Dunst for voicing her opinion are not letting her have that choice. And they are ignoring the fact that tolerance is a two-way street. It's a shame to see that, in this situation, those who claim to be the most tolerant were actually as close-minded as they could be.

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