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Princeton University Professor Peter Singer, speaking on a panel at the abortion and contraception activist conference “Women Deliver,” suggested a frightening fix to the imminent “environmental catastrophes” facing our planet - take away women's reproductive choices.

Remarking that women have more children because of their “ideological or religious views,” Singer discussed the idea of reducing the world's population to save the environment, according to LifeNews.com.

Singer added that “greenhouse gases… are getting very close to a tipping point,” and climate change could become a “catastrophe and cause hundreds of millions or billions of people to become climate refugees.”

In that case, he said, “we need to consider whether we can talk about trying to reduce population growth and whether that’s compatible with the very reasonable concerns people have about women’s right to control their life decisions and their reproduction.”

As if that couldn't be more offensive, Singer then compared the right of women to give birth to the right people have to graze their cattle on common property. Overgrazed ground - which he equates to bearing more children - leads to smaller yields, leads to disaster.

“Turns out that the right to graze as many cows as you like on the common was not an absolute right,” said Singer. “Obviously this is what I think we ought to be saying even about how many children we have… I hope we don’t get to a point where we do have to override it… but I don’t think we ought to shrink away from considering that as a possibility.”

His remarks weren't received too well, with several panelists noting that the world's population will likely peak at 9 billion people before beginning a steady decline. They contended that predictions about overpopulation and famine were way off.

The ability to bear children is not just a “right” – it’s a part of our humanity. Regulating that in any sense is not only insensitive and inhumane, but it goes against the very reason our forefathers fought for freedom in the first place.