Nineteen-year-old Kendall Jones is a cheerleader at Texas Tech University, but it's her other extracurricular activity that's gotten people talking.

Since she was 13, Kendall has been visiting private hunting grounds in Zimbabwe and South Africa to hunt wild game like elephants, zebras and lions:

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Perhaps unsurprisingly, these pictures, which are posted on Kendall's Facebook page, have garnered a lot of negative attention:

Of course, plenty of people have also shown their support for Kendall, who regularly speaks about wildlife conservation and whose hunting trips fund those efforts.

National Geographic explains how private wild game hunting actually helps protect endangered species:

In the 23 African countries that allow sport hunting, 18,500 tourists pay over $200 million a year to hunt lions, leopards, elephants, warthogs, water buffalo, impala, and rhinos.

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Private hunting operations in these countries control more than 540,000 square miles of land ... That's 22 percent more land than is protected by national parks.

It doesn't look like Kendall, for her part, is letting the haters get to her; she recently shared news of a development deal with the Sportsman Channel.

Are Kendall and other big game hunters wrong for killing these animals, even if the money used to hunt them protects their species as a whole? Share your thoughts below.

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