When 4th grader Ramsey Mcdonald's teacher asked him to bring his favorite toys in for show and tell, he couldn't expect it would lead to punishment. 

However, one of Ramsey's favorite toys was a NERF Reactor gun - and school officials classified that as a weapon. That's when Ramsey's father Scott received word of the “alleged” weapon his son had taken with him to school.

13WMAZ, a television station in Macon, Georgia, reports on what Scott said of his son's predicament.

“He told me he didn't know they would think it was a weapon or he wouldn't have brought it to school,” 

School officials followed up by slapping Ramsey with a three day in-school suspension.

Clearly, the school refuses to acknowledge the fact that Ramsey is just being a kid, and like many kids his age he likes NERF guns. The school might actually have a leg to stand on if Ramsey smuggled a real weapon to school, but a plastic gun that shoots foam balls is far from a threat.

According to police, NERF guns can cause eye injuries. But here's the thing: the NERF guns reported to cause eye injuries use darts for ammunition - Ramsey's Reactor takes foam balls. In addition, the toy is marketed for ages 6 and up, so how dangerous could it really be?

Just to be fair, if we are going to discipline kids for bringing NERF guns to show and tell, we need to discipline them for bringing their Barbie dolls too. Because all you would have to do is swing that doll with enough blunt force and you'd have another “allegedly” dangerous weapon in your hands.

Seriously though, from getting suspended for pointing a finger gun to biting pop tarts into supposed firearm shapes - and now NERF, enough is enough. It's time to stop punishing kids for simply acting like, you know, kids.