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A recent survey by polling company YouGov asked Americans what they thought was the most dangerous major city in America. The choice of the majority of respondents? Chicago.

From the YouGov poll:

The latest research from YouGov shows that according to the public America's three largest cities are also its most dangerous. Chicago, the third most populous metro area in the country, is seen as the most dangerous, with 53% of Americans saying that the city is 'unsafe' while only 33% say it is 'safe'. New York City is the seen the second most dangerous, followed by LA and DC. Texas' two largest cities, Dallas and Houston, are seen as being safest.

Here's a graph showing the results:

Capture

Chicago was the only city that a majority of respondents said is unsafe.

According to the blog Hey Jackass!, which tracks crime and murder in Chicago, Chicago goes a little more than 20 hours on average in between murders, and 84.6% of those murdered were murdered by gunshots.

This past weekend, which was bloodier than this time last year, a 17-year-old boy was among those murdered.

Source: HeyJackass!

After an especially bloody Independence Day weekend, Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy demanded even tougher gun laws, this time on the state and local level. However, Chicago already has strict gun laws - some of the toughest in the country.

Contrast this with Detroit and the attitude of its police chief, James Craig, on gun control. Craig actually changed his mind on gun control and has urged the people of Detroit to arm themselves. Moreover, crime in Detroit has been falling all throughout 2014, and Craig attributed this to the fact that the people of Detroit are taking his advice.

Chicago is at a crossroads: Keep doing what it's been doing, go into a deeper spiral of violence and cause the further downfall of other areas like education and tourism, which brings in over $12 billion to the city's economy.

Or Chicago can allow its citizens to defend themselves, which Detroit has proven is successful, and help lift itself out of the hole that it's in.

Feature image shows a collage of some of Chicago's youngest crime victims.