Notifications

Since resigning as Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton has kept a busy schedule of giving speeches - for exorbitant rates. She ruffled feathers with a $225,000 fee to speak at UNLV.

But apparently the Hollywood rate is higher. She charged UCLA $300,000. That's $50,000 more than Bill, the former President of the United States, was paid to speak in the same lecture series for a March 2014 speech.

The Washington Post reports that UCLA representatives asked Clinton's people if they could receive a discounted rate since they're a taxpayer-funded public educational institution and were told “this is the special rate.”

In addition to the fee, Clinton's contract included a list of demands that had to be met and paid for by UCLA.

Some of the items specified in the contract are:

  • Lemon wedges and both warm and room temperature water on stage
  • Case of room temperature water just off stage
  • Room temperature sparkling and still water, diet ginger ale, hummus, crudite, and cut fruit in green room
  • Computer and scanner in green room
  • Maximum of 50 photos with VIP's, who had to be waiting for her
  • Approval of style and color of armchairs to be used on stage
  • Teleprompter and 2-3 downstage scrolling monitors

In the case of the scanner, UCLA had to purchase one just for use that day.

Clinton's staff oversaw each detail, requiring a certain number of pillows on the armchairs, their shape (rectangular) and that there be extra pillows in case Hillary needed more back support. A few days prior to the speech, the representatives nixed the podium that was to be used. That required UCLA employees to scramble and find another one, and to rent a matching university seal.

Due to the cost of Clinton's contract, ticket prices started at $250 with very few free tickets available for students. Only 413 student tickets were available, and a shoving match broke out when the university held a lottery for them.

So much for the “I just want to sleep and exercise and travel for fun”  Hillary, as she described her plans to the New York Times late last year.