Notifications

President Obama took about five minutes at the White House Tribal Nations Conference to tell a whopper and blast the Grand Jury that chose not to indict a New York Police Officer who subdued a man who later died while in custody.

The case of Eric Garner is making big news today with protests on the streets of New York.

The President said he's gotten a call from his Attorney General about the no indictment of the officer and said:

My tradition is not to remark on cases where there may still be an investigation.

Except on the Henry Louis Gates case, when he said Cambridge, Massachusetts police had acted “stupidly.” Oh, and the Trayvon Martin case, when he said “if I had a son, he'd look like Trayvon.” That is, before saying that “Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago.”

Obama then heaped civil-sounding scorn on the Grand Jury of New York when he said his administration would be investigating its finding:

...We are going to be scrupulous in investigating cases where we are concerned about the impartiality and accountability that's taking place.

Here's the President's entire statement:

But I want everybody to understand that this week in the wake of Ferguson, we initiated a task force whose job it is to come back to me with specific recommendations with how we strengthen the relationship between law enforcements and communities of color and minority communities that feel that bias is taking place.

That we are going to take specific steps to improve training and the work with state and local governments when it comes to policing in communities of color.

That we are going to be scrupulous in investigating cases where we are concerned about the impartiality and accountability that's taking place.

And I said when I met with folks both from Ferguson, law enforcement and clergy, civil rights activists. I said this is an issue we've been dealing with for too long and it's time for us to make more progress than we've made. And I'm not interested in talk I'm interested in action and I am absolutely committed as President of the United States to making sure that we have a country in which everybody believes in the core principle that we are equal under the law.

I want everyone to know here ... we are not going to let up until we see a strengthening of the trust and a strengthening of the accountability that exists between our communities and our law enforcement.

[Police are] only going to be able to do their job effectively as long as everybody has confidence in the system.

...we recognize this as an American problem.

When anybody in this country is not being treated equally under the law that's a problem and it's my job as president to help solve it.

Sounds like a Presidential threat.

But then again, when did Obama ever become involved in a matter for local law enforcement and second guess due process rendered in a court of law?