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A-Lister Vince Vaughn has risen through Hollywood's ranks over the years to become one of America's best-known actors.

But one thing people might not know about the six-foot-five actor is that his strong political views tend to go against the Hollywood norm.

In an interview with Playboy, the conversation tilted towards politics, and Vaughn admitted that he considers himself a libertarian:

“I would use the term libertarian to describe my politics. I like the principles of the Constitution and the republic, which is a form of government built around the law.”

Throughout the interview, Vaughn expounded on his view of 'big government,' his right to own a gun, the problem with affirmative action and the importance of political discourse.

Vaughn explained that he's an avid supporter of Ron Paul, because he believes Paul woke people up to the fact that the government can't solve all our problems:

"Trusting the federal government to know what we need and to run things well feels like a bad idea.

You see that in the foreign policy of force, where the United States decides to go into another country to make things turn out a certain way. It doesn’t work. It causes more problems.

Just look at any of these undeclared wars. You’re suggesting at gunpoint that you’ll decide how things will go. The results haven’t gone well."

Vaughn also opened up about gun ownership:

“I believe in the right to defend yourself if need be.”

He didn't identify as a gun enthusiast, but said it's not fair for one group to decide an individual's rights:

 “I believe it’s up to the individual. I don’t believe rights come in groups. You shouldn’t get more or fewer rights because of what you believe in or what nationality you were born into.”

Later, Vaughn was asked about affirmative action. Instead of going on a rant, Vaughn replied with a question:

“I’ll answer that with a question. Do you believe that using race as a factor in evaluating a person is a good way to operate?”

He explained further:

"But then you’re evaluating someone based on race, which is racism. Rights don’t come to you because you’re a man or a woman or African American or European or Jewish.

And I certainly don’t think the federal government should be in the business of deciding things or handing out money based on factors like these."

Vaughn said he feels the same way when it comes to gay marriage.

“It’s the same with same-sex marriage. Who cares what people feel about each other? Let people decide for themselves who they can marry. It’s not the government’s job. It’s between you and your partner and your church or synagogue or whatever you believe in.”

Vaughn made it clear that he doesn't have any intentions of running for office in the near future, but that doesn't mean he isn't passionate about the issues.

Most recently Vaughn teamed up with filmmakers Glen Beck and Peter Billingsly in a film called Art of Conflict, which is about the Protestant and Catholic struggle in Belfast.