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In hopes of spreading the word about a “killer in your fridge,” blogger Rhonda Gessner, shared one woman's story.

Fourteen years ago, the woman became very ill. She suffered from stomach spasms and dealt with excruciating pain— even walking “was a chore.”

Image Credit: Screen Shot/YouTube
Screen Shot/YouTube

Less than a year later, in March 2002, the woman had undergone several tissue and muscle biopsies. By this time, she was taking 24 prescribed medications, but doctors had no idea what was wrong.

“She just knew she was dying.”

That's when she started making plans. She put all of her possession in her oldest daughter's name to ensure that her kids — both young and old — were taken care of, and planned her “last hooray” to Florida for March 22.

As Rhonda Gessner writes, three days before the woman embarked on her final adventure, new test results led doctors to believe she had Multiple Sclerosis (MS). As she told her sister the news over the phone, her sister remembered an article she was sent by a friend.

Her sister asked her if she drank diet soda. Oddly enough, she was just getting ready to “crack one open that moment.”

As it turns out, although aspartame is found in many diet drinks and is FDA approved, some studies show that people were being misdiagnosed with MS when they were actually suffering from aspartame poisoning.

According to cancer.org, aspartame is one of the most popular artificial sweeteners used as a sugar substitute in some foods and beverages.

“Aspartame is used in many foods and beverages because it is about 200 times sweeter than sugar, so much less of it can be used to give the same level of sweetness. This, in turn, lowers the calories in the food or beverage.”

As MDHealth.com reports, the reason for aspartame poisoning is that, unlike saccharin, the body digests aspartame. The digestive and absorption process results in aspartame accumulating in the body and resulting in health problems.

Image Credit: Screen Shot/YouTube
Screen Shot/YouTube

Symptoms of aspartame poisoning can include:

  • Breathlessness
  • Elevated blood pressure
  • Upset stomach, abdominal pain, diarrehea
  • Intense itching and hives

Recognizing the potential health concerns, Pepsi released their newest edition of diet soda which ditched aspartame all together. The Pepsi Company now uses an artificial sweetener called sucralose, which used in popular sweeteners like Splenda. Because sucralose cannot be digested, it doesn't accumulate in the body the way aspartame does.

As for the woman, after she stopped drinking diet soda she told her sister that although she “she didn't feel 100%” her health had majorly improved. After she brought the article to her doctor's attention, she was out of her wheelchair in 32 hours and down to only one prescribed medication by the time she left for Florida. That medicine was for aspartame poisoning.