Dusty Stribel was diagnosed with muscular dystrophy as a child. Though he fought it for years, he finally became wheelchair bound about two years ago.

The past two years haven't been easy for Dusty, his wife, Kionna, and their eight-year-old daughter, but they've been learning and adjusting.

Because of this, it was extremely painful when they returned to their vehicle after a meal at Olive Garden in Oklahoma City only to find a nasty note on the windshield.

Hurtful as it was, it provided an opportunity for Dusty and Kionna to teach their daughter — who poignantly asked why someone who didn't know them would do that — a lesson in treating others as you want to be treated.

Kionna explained to her daughter that some people don't understand how deeply their actions can affect others, some people have hate in their hearts. She said that this person probably couldn't fathom what their family was experiencing.

“These people didn’t know us. They didn’t know that my husband has Muscular Dystrophy and has struggled with it his entire life,” she writes. “They didn’t know that even though his doctors advised him to go into a wheelchair years ago, he refused, and instead, remained on his own two feet until he finally fell for the last time, blowing out both knees and breaking an ankle.”

She added that this heartless person probably has no idea that Dusty lives in constant pain, and that his large stomach is a result of having no stomach muscles left.

This person probably doesn't realize that their hurtful words just add to the pain that Dusty already feels on a daily basis.

“And because they didn’t know, they allowed the hate in their hearts to get the better of them.”

But because this person let the hate in the hearts overrule the good, Kionna was able to remind her daughter that through their struggles, they have come out stronger. And because of that, they are truly blessed.

Kionna also hopes that whomever wrote the note will read her Facebook post. Maybe then they will realize the importance of thinking before acting because oftentimes, people are fighting battles that aren't outwardly visible; people are struggling in ways that those that don't know them just can't see.