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The timeline of Henry and Chericia Brown's tumultuous relationship starts back in November 2015, when Chericia learned her husband and father of her two children was having an affair.

Roughly 16 days after learning about the affair, Chericia asked Henry for a divorce.

According to the timeline made by the Seminole County Sheriff's Office, a domestic abuse claim made by Chericia on December 18, 2015 was dismissed after police heard inconsistent stories and saw a lack of evidence.

Less than a week later, a temporary injunction was served. Henry was to have no contact with Chericia or their kids, and all of his firearms were to be confiscated. He told the officer serving the injunction that he wasn't in possession of any firearms.

Although Henry violated the permanent injunction multiple times between January and March 2016, Chericia never reported it.

In April 2016, Henry bought a tracking device and put it on Chericia's car. Tracking his estranged wife's movements to a Chili's restaurant, Henry hid in the trunk of her car and waited for her to leave, stabbing her 15 times before bystanders chased him away.

Henry drove off, running over Chericia's body in the process and hitting those trying to help her. His car was later found, abandoned.

Driving another car to evade police, Henry picked up his two children, aged one and four, at their babysitter's house. The sitter, thinking something was off about the encounter, called 911 twice.

Henry found out where his wife and the others were transported for medical care through a local news report, and made his way to the hospital. Before arriving, Henry wrote a suicide note and made two phone calls: One to his father wishing his parents a happy anniversary, and another to his father-in-law telling him in a voicemail:

“I did what I did. I let her have it.”

Friends at the hospital immediately recognized Henry in the lobby and alerted police. He fled while firing rounds with a gun that should have been turned over when the injunction was served months prior.

Police blew out Henry's tires, and as they approached his truck they found him deceased from a self-inflicted gun shot wound. His children were also deceased. Chericia also succumbed to her injuries.

Only nine days prior to her death, Chericia called 911 to report that Brown was harassing her at day care and then disabled her car. Deputy Chad Tavenner with the Seminole Police Department and another sergeant were called to the scene to help, but Tavenner never reported it.

According to the Seminole Sheriff's Office, had a report been filed, Henry would have likely been wearing a GPS monitor. Tavenner was fired after trying to cover up the incident.

As the Domestic Abuse Shelter reports, 70 percent of all domestic abuse cases go unreported and most women are assaulted upwards of 35 times before the abuse actually gets reported. About 4,000 women die each year at the hands domestic violence, and 75 percent of those deaths occur after a woman tries the leave her significant other.

Henry's mistress also came forward saying that on two separate occasions Henry asked her to kill his wife. She refused, but admitted to being too scared to tell the police.

What happened to Chericia is an example of why all signs of domestic abuse should be reported and taken seriously.