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TOPSHOT - The sister (L) of Mohammed Ismael, who died in one of three suicide car bombings claimed by the Islamic State (IS) group in the nearby town of Tal Tamr earlier this week, mourns during his funeral in Qamishli, a Kurdish-majority city in Syria's northeastern Hasakeh province, on December 13, 2015. Tal Tamr, in the Khabur region, is controlled by Kurdish forces and has been targeted in the past by IS jihadists, who in February overran much of Khabur and kidnapped at least 220 Assyrian Christians. AFP PHOTO / DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP / DELIL SOULEIMAN (Photo credit should read DELIL SOULEIMAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Getty — Delil Souleiman/AFP

In Syria, Christians once lived a relatively peaceful life.

When the Civil War came, however, that life was threatened as their neighborhoods turned to battlefields and terrorist groups like ISIS engaged in a brutal tug of war for territory and power.

Christians have been crucified, beheaded, and forced from their homes by ISIS.

Bloodshed, terror, and death have led many in Syria, not just Christians, to flee the country. To date, over 11 million Syrians have left their homes.

Syrian refugees wait for transportation after crossing into Turkey from the Syrian town of Tal Abyad, near Akcakale in Sanliurfa province, on June 10, 2015. More than 2,000 refugees crossed from Syria into Turkey on Wednesday, fleeing clashes pitting Kurdish fighters against the Islamic State (IS) group, according a Turkish official. They left their war-torn country via the Turkish border post of Akcakale, which faces the IS-held Syrian town of Tel Abyad. AFP PHOTO / STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
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Some are still displaced, some sit in refugee camps, and some have made it to countries that agreed to take them in.

The United States, on President Obama's order, was slated to take in 10,000 of the refugees who were fleeing Syria. And with 10,801 refugees now in America, we have now exceeded that target.

Yet, some Americans are crying injustice when it comes to just how many Christian refugees America rolled out the welcome mat for.

Fox News reported that:

The Obama administration hit its goal this week of admitting 10,000 Syrian refugees — yet only a fraction of a percent are Christians, stoking criticism that officials are not doing enough to address their plight in the Middle East.

Of the 10,801 refugees accepted in fiscal 2016 from the war-torn country, 56 are Christians — or .5 percent.

The reactions to the numbers has been quite strong:

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While one person asked why the religious affiliation of the refugee should matter:

It's not clear how the U.S. decides which refugees to take in. However, earlier this year Secretary of State John Kerry declared that Christians, Yazidis, and Shiite Muslims were “victims of genocide” by ISIS.

As far as the refugees the U.S. accepted, 10,600 are Sunni Muslims, 17 are Yazidi, and 20 are Shiite.

With only 56 Syrian Christians being admitted into the country, it's not difficult to see why members of one of the oldest religions in the Middle East — who are in fear for their lives every day — might feel like America's leaving them behind.