With barely two weeks until Election Day, it stands to reason that both the Clinton and Trump campaigns would be hitting the trail hard.

As Hillary Clinton was slated to attend a “star-studded” New York City fundraiser on Monday night, her running mate Tim Kaine traveled to Florida to sway undecided voters in the battleground state.

Unfortunately for Kaine, he may have walked away Monday afternoon feeling less than enthused. As The Week reported, it may well have qualified as “the saddest rally ever”:

Another local — who clearly identified as a Trump supporter — also took some footage of the Kaine rally, noting that there appeared to be “only about 30 people” in attendance:

To be sure, it also stands to reason that vice-presidential candidates traditionally don't draw as large of a crowd as their presidential partners.

Nonetheless, the turnout at Trump running mate Mike Pence's rally — held that same afternoon just a few states away in North Carolina — was considerably different:

According to local media, Pence drew a crowd of roughly 500 people in Salisbury, North Carolina, where he reminded the crowd just how tight the “one-point race” remains in the state.

Speaking at Catawba College, Pence warned voters that their support would amount to more than just “a choice between two people”:

"This election really is about more than a choice between two people.

It’s really, in my book, a choice between two futures. So let me tell you where I stand. I choose a stronger America."

Even if that number of 500 takes into account the seemingly common sight of protesters at the Pence rally — said to be about 50 — the difference in the two crowds is telling.

Throughout Trump's campaign, massive rallies have become something of a theme, with reports often noting that thousands have been turned away from some of his events due to venue capacity.

As to whether or not these huge crowds will amount to an equally large voter turnout for Trump on November 8th, only time will tell.

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