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When Hillary Clinton's stunning defeat became official early Wednesday morning, many decried the fact that America had missed its opportunity to elect its first female president.

While Democrats may have failed to break that particular glass ceiling, a different woman who did make history that night seems to have had her accomplishment overlooked by much of the media.

With Donald Trump's victory, Kellyanne Conway became the first female to run a winning U.S. presidential campaign.

While Conway had reportedly acted as a senior adviser to Trump earlier in his presidential run, it wasn't until mid-August that she took over as campaign manager.

Since then, she's successfully managed a presidential candidate unlike any other, forging a path straight to the White House.

For Conway, though — who says that she has no illusions that she's in a “very male-dominated business” — the fact that she's a woman has very little to do with her success. She says:

"I wasn't hired because of my gender. But it's a special responsibility.

I want to do right, apart from my gender — I want to do right as a campaign manager."

Things weren't exactly pleasant for Conway during the election, either. She regularly faced attacks from Hollywood and the media both in doing her job:

As well as on a more personal basis:

For a well-educated, working mother of four young kids to rise so far on her own terms — in a party often vilified by the left as sexist and misogynistic, nonetheless — certainly seems like a success story worth celebrating.

In the end, that her decidedly historical achievement as a woman has been generally overlooked might have more to do with her political affiliation than anything else.

Her dedication to her goal and her candidate, however, has clearly paid off.