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Everyone tuned in to see Ronda Rousey make a comeback during UFC 207. After a devastating defeat came at the hands — and feet — of challenger Holly Holm last year, Rousey seemed determined to retake her title.

But after just 48 seconds in the octagon with the relatively unknown Amanda Nunes, Rousey was handed her second major defeat in as many fights.

Before Rousey even had time to recover, the attacks started rolling in via social media.

Many took issue with the fact that Rousey, who has spent a fair amount of time marketing herself outside of the fighting arena, walked away with a hefty payday despite her loss — and they laid the blame on Rousey's 'white privilege':

But there is one thing that Rousey's critics are missing: she isn't exactly white. Rousey's heritage is mixed — she has called herself “half Venezuelan, a quarter English, a quarter Polish, 100% American,” and although some question her percentages, the ethnic mix is very real.

Rousey's great-grandfather was Alfred Ernest Waddell, a native of Trinidad and Tobago (islands just 5 miles from the Venezuelan coast) — was a social activist and one of the first black physicians in the United States. Her great-grandmother, Amelia Castillo, was Venezuelan.

Rousey's mother, a judoka champion in her own right, has dedicated years of her life to activism, as well, in support of Native American causes.