On Wednesday, women around the globe attempted to show their value by not working or shopping for 24 hours.

The United States's strike is titled “A Day Without a Woman,” and reaffirms the commitment to the “Principles of Unity” that drove the “Women's March.” Those principles are listed on the website as:

  • Ending Violence
  • Reproductive Rights
  • LGBTQIA Rights
  • Workers' Rights
  • Civil Rights
  • Immigrant Rights
  • Environmental Justice

As an extension of the “Women's March,” the website identifies the connection it has with the rest of the world.

It says:

The Women's March stands in solidarity with the International Women's Strike organizers, feminists of color and grassroots groups in planning global actions for equity, justice and human rights.

While the specific “Principles of Unity” seem to promote equality for all, the agenda of the “International Women's Strike” is alarming.

As listed on its website, one of the platforms of the “International Women's Strike” is the “decolonization of Palestine.”

Under the subsection “For an Antiracist and Anti-imperialist Feminism,” it says:

This means that movements such as Black Lives Matter, the struggle against police brutality and mass incarceration, the demand for open borders and for immigrant rights and for the decolonization of Palestine are for us the beating heart of this new feminist movement.

According to Legal Insurrection, the decolonization of Palestine is a phrase often used when referring to the elimination of Israel as a nation on the basis that Israel is a “colonizing” state that has taken over Palestinian land.

Zionist Emily Shire described why the "beating heart of this new feminist movement' is concerning to her. In an op-ed piece for The New York Times, she wrote:

I find it troubling that embracing such a view is considered an essential part of an event that is supposed to unite feminists. I am happy to debate Middle East politics or listen to critiques of Israeli policies. But why should criticism of Israel be key to feminism in 2017?

Shire went on to speculate whether or not, as a Zionist, she had a place in the feminist movement.

The anti-Israel sentiment seems to be reinforced by the “International Women's Strike” decision to translate the webpage into another language.

The webpage is translated to Arabic for some of their international readers. Hebrew, also an official language in Israel, is noticeably absent.

Endorsements for the movement include various pro-Palestine organizations. One of them, Al-Awda, The Palestine Right to Return Coalition, advocates for Palestinian refugees who have been “forcibly evicted” from their homes by Israeli forces.

Another endorser is the group American Muslims for Palestine, and its website claims:

For decades, numerous plans have been put forward to achieve ‘peace’ between the Palestinians and Israel. None of them has worked, mostly because time and again, Israel has proven it does not want peace.

While the “A Day Without Women” movement has been endorsed by at least two Jewish groups — Jews for Palestinian Right of Return and Jewish Voice for Peace — both organizations are pro-Palestinian, vocally condemning Israel's settlement in “Palestinian territory.”

This isn't the only connection between the movement and anti-Israeli factions

In 1970, one of the demonstration's co-organizers, Rasmea Odeh, was convicted for her participation in two separate bombings in Israel:

Rasmea confessed to the terrorism but was released ten years later as part of a prisoner exchange. She later moved to America and was found guilty of immigration fraud. She remains in the United States awaiting appeal.

While participants of the “A Day Without a Woman” movement are seeking equality, they may inadvertently be contributing to the suppression of an entire nation.