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Note: This article contains coarse language that may offend some readers.

Since 2015, a popular YouTube channel called “DaddyOFive” has featured a Maryland family with five siblings.

The clips revolve around the dad and mom filming their kids' reactions to an array of different “pranks.”

Their channel has garnered over 700,000 subscribers, but that's not to say it hasn't been repeatedly scrutinized.

Numerous, popular YouTube channels first noticed DaddyOFive's videos when the “pranks” grew into what some viewers considered emotional and physical abuse.

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In fact, even former “Jackass” star Steve-O chimed in on the subject, calling the videos “emotional abuse.”

In a video with another popular YouTuber Ethan, the former “Jackass” star made several sarcastic remarks about the cruel nature of the DaddyOFive videos:

“It's not really an undertone of cruelty ... it's right up there. Emotional abuse.”

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And Ethan agreed, saying:

“It's good to get inside of your kid's head and build, like, a relationship of mistrust ... even [to the point of the kids hating] your parents as much as possible.”

The two men proceeded to film their own mock version of the infamous ink “prank.”

It involved urinating on another person, so viewer discretion is advised after the 8:10 mark:

But their point, guised in mockery, proved to be a valid one.

According to CBS News, even Baltimore's Family and Children Services clinical supervisor, Julia Knach, has called the videos out for posing harm to the kids, saying:

"The kids are obviously distressed even during what they believe are pranks. There is emotional harm done there.”

Although all but one video — an apology issued to viewers claiming the content was fake and staged — has since been deleted from the channel, other high profile YouTube videos like Steve-O's called out the alleged abuse.

YouTuber Phillip DeFranco — who has more than five million subscribers — uploaded some of the family's controversial videos onto his own channel and pointed out that they all seemed to target one child — a young boy named Cody.

Another popular YouTuber, Kavos, called out the parents' “shocking” videos, as well. He showed his own viewers clips from DaddyOFive videos — highlighting every example of child abuse, in his opinion.

One “prank” featured an older sibling thoroughly trashing Cody's room. He threw Cody's toys, dismantled some containers, destroyed his bed, and emptied Cody's closet onto the floor. Naturally, Cody flew in to see what the all the noise was and immediately burst into a fit of anger and tears after seeing his room demolished.

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But his father received even harsher criticism when he insisted Cody was the one who had to clean it all up. The little boy was visibly distraught — screaming and crying at his family for picking on him.

Kavos also accused the parents of inflicting physical harm onto their children, namely Cody, in another video in which the father shoved his young son's face into a bookshelf.

Later in the video, Cody was seen with a visible wound under his nose and a red spot on his pillow. However, according to Kavos, his father claimed that Cody had a scab on his nose and the red spot was ink.

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Yet despite all of these “pranks,” the flood of criticism actually didn't come until one of DaddyOFive's most recent episodes.

The video, per Phillip DeFranco, featured the parents spilling “invisible ink” all over Cody's bedroom carpet — an apparent play on the child's recent, accidental ink spill.

When his parents “discovered” the new huge ink stain in his bedroom, they addressed it by screaming a string of profanities at the boy while summoning him upstairs.

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Cody denied the spill was his, but his parents proceeded to accuse him — while continuing to throw 'F-bombs,' with their other children present, as well.

Then finally, after minutes of crying, they finally informed their children that they had been “pranked.”

It wasn't long before viewers recognized that what took place in the video couldn't have been “fake,” according to DeFranco.

DeFranco's video alone has been viewed upwards of 2.5 million times. And most viewers agree that the video's content is utter abuse:

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And when the parents alleged that all videos were their own children's ideas, viewers weren't buying it:

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Most people feel that these “pranks” are inflicting serious damage upon Cody's mental health:

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In addition to the apology video DaddyOFive posted — which, again, insisted their content is fake and even declared that all the criticism has posed “real harm” to their family — they also took to Twitter.

DaddyOFive released an update stating they do not condone child abuse and have dealt with the backlash as a family:

Fox News reported that Montgomery County Child Protective Services neither confirmed nor denied whether it would conduct an investigation into the parents.