The War At Home: Trump And The Mainstream Media  - 2017 SXSW Conference and Festivals
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For those long on the conservative side of the American political aisle, expectations for the mainstream media, and Washington correspondents in particular, have never been very high. In fact, the only real expectation we truly have is that they will be biased against us.

In that, they rarely disappoint.

Donald Trump's presidency, however, has given birth to a new golden age of media bias. No longer are they engaged in a loosely-connected effort fueled by prejudices that were reinforced in journalism school. Now they're carrying out a love affair with each other so shameless that professional romance writers are probably trying to keep lunch down.

These days, it isn't at all unusual to see something like this:

The lede referenced above, by the way, was this:

That's someone from one news organization praising someone from a rival news organization for making a derogatory comment about the president. Which, incidentally, I saw on Twitter because someone from a third news organization was retweeting it.

Welcome to journalism in 2017.

When they aren't massaging each other in so much virtue lotion (a phrase I recently coined), they're busy doing things like comparing the leader of the free world to a four-year-old:

All right, so that was an opinion piece. We can save the argument about whether there is a difference between the Opinion page and the front page of The New York Times for another day.

While we're on the subject of kids, there was this gem from Friday night:

That continues a longstanding tradition of liberals using their children as puppets for their own opinions, all the while pretending that little Astrid and Conan are just super-precocious haters of all things Republican.

Side note: it is unclear why CNN International (italics added) was seeking out children in Pennsylvania to weigh in on American politics.

This media feeding frenzy/love affair is at the core of many arguments in center-right politics at the moment. The devout anti-Trump conservatives have taken to giving the media a pass, if not outright embracing it lately, all because they see Trump as a real threat to conservatism.

Many of us, however, feel that the media is now being almost weaponized in its attempts to disrupt this presidency. Those of us in that camp keep pressing the issue that they will be here long after Trump is gone, even if he stays longer than they'd like him to.

It's like having a neighbor you hate being chased by a ravenous bear as you incessantly spray him with steak scent to help get rid of him. Eventually, the bear will win and your hated neighbor will be gone.

Then the bear will reveal himself to be more ravenous than you thought and, just like that, there's a new victim.

It's quite obvious that the media view themselves almost as a single entity in pursuit of destroying a common enemy. To be sure, President Trump has drawn battle lines but, honestly, a lot of us have been waiting our entire political lives for a Republican to do that.

There is actually real news coming out from time to time but the MSM spends so much effort touting what they wish to be true (RUSSIA!) and praising each other for every anonymously-sourced story that the good stuff can get drowned out by the noise.

It is nigh on impossible to take journalism seriously when you see things like this from what is supposed to be the most respected newspaper in all the land:

That was followed up with this #FollowFriday suggestion from the Times:

When journalistic integrity devolves into nothing more than a clumsy promposal, what ever is to be taken seriously?

The above exchange was so awful that it got some ribbing from another very left-leaning journo:

For the most part, the love scribblings to each other on Twitter continue practically unabated:

That's from the guy who was “reporting” on the Trump campaign for a little news outfit called CBS last year.

If what's most important is being popular with one's colleagues, where is the incentive to be truthful at all times when reporting the news?

Yes, that was rhetorical.

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