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Critics of former Attorney General Loretta Lynch have been skeptical of her involvement in the investigation into Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server from the outset.

Then came the infamous “happenstance” tarmac meeting with former President Bill Clinton in June 2016, during which Lynch later claimed they simply “talked about his grandchildren.”

Even former FBI Director James Comey said during his May 2017 testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee that the meeting aboard Lynch's private plane was “a capper” for him, adding that, as a result, he no longer believed the Justice Department could “credibly” complete the investigation.

Then came the now-former director's June testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee and his revelation that Lynch had ordered him to refer to the Clinton investigation as a “matter.”

Now, as reported by The Hill, Senate Republicans are turning their attention somewhat away from Comey and straight toward Lynch:

The Hill quotes multiple GOP senators who are now “clamoring” to hear from Lynch.

Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) said much of Comey's behavior was driven by his lack of confidence in the former attorney general:

“Frankly, a lot of what Hillary Clinton was exposed to by Director Comey's misconduct and the way he handled that was apparently in response to his lack of confidence in the attorney general, and I think there is a lot we could learn from that.”

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), a former judge advocate in the U.S. Air Force, wants the House Judiciary Committee to get more involved, as The Hill reports:

“The accusations now that [...] the current and former attorney general were political — that has nothing to do with Russia as much as it has to do with how the Department of Justice is being run. I want to find out all about that.”

Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) echoed Graham's comments:

“Well, I kind of would like to get the whole thing behind us, but she should be interrogated because there's some real questions about whether her actions were proper.”

Even Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) said during a recent appearance on CNN that she would've gotten a “queasy feeling” if she had been asked by Lynch to call the FBI investigation a “matter”:

“I think we need to know more about that and there's only one way to know about it and that's to have the Judiciary Committee take a look at that.”

Incidentally, President Donald Trump got out ahead of the curve last week, declaring Lynch's involvement in the investigation “totally illegal”:

Either way, the “clamor” is unlikely to die down unless Lynch testifies — if even then.