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Multimillionaire Al Gore took a break from his occupation as a Career Climate Alarmist to make shocking, unsubstantiated claims in another arena: revisionist political history.

Gore, who spends nearly seven times more energy to heat his mansion pool than the average American household uses in a year, went on the Bill Maher show Saturday and made a pretty wild claim: that he won the 2000 election.

Maher set Gore up for the claim, asking about losing Florida to the effects of global warming:

“So when the sea levels rise, obviously we could lose, like, Venice. We could lose Florida. And who would know better about losing Florida?”

The crowd booed and laughed. then Gore said this:

“Actually, I think I carried Florida. But that’s another … We won’t go there.”

Maher gave the broken Gore a pity “That's right, there ya go,” after Gore said he believes he is the rightful 43rd president of the United States.

However, a quick fact check shows that claim to be false.

Florida was historically close in the 2000 election and a recount was even one, but the Supreme Court ruled that George W. Bush was president and George W. Bush served for eight years beginning on January 20th, 2001.

Life after losing the presidency has been just fine for Gore.

This week, Gore's sequel to “An Inconvenient Truth,” called “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power” arrives in movie theaters.

Gore has been repping the movie nonstop, hoping for another multi-million dollar payday. "An Inconvenient Truth” made $50 million at the box office and netted Gore a Nobel Peace Prize. Since losing the 2000 election, Gore has made climate change the center of his political portfolio, and business has been good.

Al Gore’s net worth has swelled to $200 million off of profits he has earned from his climate change rhetoric, including a hefty speakers fee, large global events, celebrity cruises, and book and movie deals.

Please note: This is a commentary piece. The views and opinions expressed within it are those of the author only and do not necessarily reflect the editorial opinion of IJR