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Staffers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture have been instructed to stop using the term “climate change,” and opt instead for “weather extremes” or similar terms.

As reported by The Guardian, USDA officials told staffers at the department's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to change the way they discuss “climate change,” and other “weather-related” phenomena in their communications:

“The agency continuously evaluates its messaging to America's farmers, ranchers and foresters as they work to implement voluntary conservation on their operations to improve the health of our soil, air, water and habitat."

It gets better.

"Climate change adaptation" should now be referred to as “resilience to weather extremes,” while efforts to “reduce greenhouse gases” should be termed efforts to “build soil organic matter, [or] increase nutrient use efficiency.”

While The Guardian refers to the changed terminology as “censoring” and “blacklisting,” the USDA directive is in line with President Donald Trump and his administration's skepticism of anthropomorphic (human-caused) climate change.

NRCS Deputy Chief for Programs Jimmy Bramblett said in an email to agency officials:

“It has become clear one of the previous administration’s priorities is not consistent with that of the incoming administration. Namely, that priority is climate change.”

But NRCS communications director Kaveh Sadeghzadeh said his office “has not received direction from USDA or the administration to modify its communications on climate change or any other topic,” adding:

“The agency continuously evaluates its messaging to America's farmers, ranchers, and foresters as they work to implement voluntary conservation on their operations to improve the health of our soil, air, water and habitat."

Hmm. Sounds like he's at least gotten wind of the changes, huh?

Either way, the hardest hit? Yeah, this guy:

Unfair to drag Gore into the mix? Of course not.

In addition to the estimated $300 million Gore has accumulated as a climate change alarmist, his home in Tennessee — one of three he owns — reportedly uses seven times more energy than that of the average American home.

We won't even get into the private jets.

Incidentally, as reported by The Washington Times, Gore's “Inconvenient Sequel” bombed at the box office during its opening weekend, coming in at a cool — see what we did there? — 15th place.

Meanwhile, weather extremes are cyclical, but we'll get into that at a later date.

Please note: This is a commentary piece. The views and opinions expressed within it are those of the author only and do not necessarily reflect the editorial opinion of IJR.