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Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), who was once considered to be on Hillary Clinton's short list of vice presidential options, took a swing at the Clintons in a Saturday speech.

Warren took the stage at Netroots Nation, an annual liberal conference that took place in Atlanta over the weekend, and the crowd was certainly happy to see her.

Warren has overcome accusations regarding her heritage and allegations of “cultural appropriation” — she claims Cherokee roots, though the Cherokee Nation has said she is not a Cherokee Nation citizen — to become something of a Democratic darling.

And on Saturday, she stood up before her fans to claim victory: The far left, not the moderate agenda, controls the party now.

The New York Times reported:

While not invoking former President Bill Clinton or Hillary Clinton by name, Ms. Warren sent an unambiguous message that she believes the Clinton effort to push Democrats toward the political center should be relegated to history.

“The Democratic Party isn’t going back to the days of welfare reform and the crime bill,” she said, highlighting measures Mr. Clinton signed into law as president that are reviled by much of the left. “It is not going to happen.”

Ignoring the fact that the Democratic National Committee is still awash in controversy — Chairman Tom Perez, a Clinton ally, tried to mend fences by selecting Keith Ellison, who had the support of Bernie Sanders (I-VT), with little success — Warren claimed ownership of the party for the far left:

“We are not the gate-crashers of today’s Democratic Party. We are not a wing of today’s Democratic Party. We are the heart and soul of today’s Democratic Party.”

She concluded her remarks with a promise “to persist,” at which the cheers of the crowd gave way to chants of “Warren 2020!”

While Warren may believe that her rallying cries the way to win votes in the quickly approaching 2018 midterm elections, she ought to at least take note of the fact that the push to the hard left that she so boldly champions is what drove many moderate Democrats like Sen. Jim Webb (D-VA) into the waiting arms of the GOP.

Webb famously dropped out of the 2016 Democratic primary saying, “this is not my Democratic party anymore,” and even hinted that he would vote for Trump over Hillary Clinton.

Please note: This is a commentary piece. The views and opinions expressed within it are those of the author only and do not necessarily reflect the editorial opinion of IJR