Notifications

Gage Skidmore/Flickr, Texas Military Department/Flickr

On Friday, Category 4 Hurricane Harvey made landfall and although it's been downgraded to a tropical storm, heavy rain and floods continue to leave a wake of devastation throughout Texas.

While people are losing their homes and remain stranded until rescuers can reach them, people have begun to try to find someone to blame for Mother Nature's wrath.

For one professor at the University of Tampa, the blame falls squarely on GOP supporters, according to tweets captured by Campus Reform.

“I don't believe in instant Karma but this kinda feels like it for Texas,” Ken Storey, an assistant sociology professor, tweeted. “Hopefully this will help them realize the GOP doesn't care about them.”

Texas Military Department/Flickr

Another user commented in response to his tweet that there are “lots of good people” in Texas and suggested that he “rethink” his stance.

Instead of taking a step back and reasoning that just because a person doesn't necessarily agree with you politically, it doesn't mean they should lose everything — including possibly their life — the professor clarified whom he was blaming.

“Well, the good people there need to do more to stop the evil their state pushes,” he tweeted. “I'm only blaming those who support the GOP there.”

Texas National Guard/Flickr

The responding user, whom Campus Reform reported is from Florida, pushed back again by questioning if Florida, a red state as well and where Storey is employed, deserves some “karma,” too.

“Yep, those who voted for him [President Donald Trump] there deserve it as well,” the professor responded.

At a time when 10 people have reportedly lost their lives and thousands are displaced or waiting for help, his claim that GOP supporters brought this on themselves was not appreciated.

On Monday night, Storey didn't apologize for what he said, but claimed he “deeply regret[s]” the statement, adding that he “never meant to wish ill will upon any group”:

In a longer statement to ABC News affiliate WFTS, he claimed he was referencing the GOP's “denial of climate change” and expressed hope that Republican politicians recognize the necessity for an increase in funding to Federal Emergency Management Agency and other relief organizations.

University of Tampa Director of Public Information and Publications Eric Cardenas explained that the tweets were sent from his private account and not in his “capacity as a faculty member.”

“The University of Tampa stands in solidarity with the people impacted by Hurricane Harvey, and our thoughts and prayers are with all involved,“ a statement to WFTS said. ”The University of Tampa condemns these comments and the sentiment behind them."

In 2005, New Orleans — a heavily Democratic area — bore the brunt of one of the deadliest hurricanes in U.S. history. So, it seems Mother Nature doesn't discriminate based on political party.

Check out what a few Tampa residents think in the video below.