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The 38th annual Emmy awards for News & Documentary provide Americans with useful insight into how journalistic contributions are esteemed in the media industry.

The conspicuous absence of news valued by Republicans and conservatives speaks volumes about the awards panel's priorities. It is important to note there is ample room for a diversity of viewpoints in the U.S. media; the issue is not whether or not a particular award recipient is deserving of the recognition.

In the case of the Emmy Awards for News & Documentary, the lack of ideological and political balance is appreciable.

The following represents the Emmy Awards by television or news network:

Emmyonline.org

The awards for PBS (12), CBS (9), ABC (5), CNN (3), and MSNBC (2) belie the fact that Fox News, the only conservative-leaning network on television, is shut out again despite its routinely strong viewership. There are no 2017 Emmy Awards for anchors like Bret Baier or Shepard Smith, or for commentators like Dr. Charles Krauthammer; such accolades are bestowed on CNN's Anderson Cooper and MSNBC's Rachel Maddow.

Fox News did not win any Emmy awards in 2016, either. Or 2015. Or 2014. Or 2013. Or 2012. The news network is quite obviously being excluded from all consideration.

Maddow won one of her awards, “Outstanding News Discussion & Analysis,” for the bipartisan issue of the crisis in Flint. Her second award, “Outstanding Live Interview,” was given for her interview with Trump administration official Kellyanne Conway. “Anderson Cooper 360” won for its reportage on Trump University Fraud.

Emmy Awards were given for outstanding investigations on terrorism (PBS), gangs (ABC's “Nightline”), and foreign wars (CBS's “60 Minutes”). Again, this is not to argue that any given recipient is undeserving of recognition.

However, if awards can be given for investigations holding the Republican Party and the Trump administration accountable, then there should be more inclusion of investigative reports on matters such as Hillary Clinton's private email practices and Sen. Bob Menendez's corruption trial.

Such recognition would signal to an American public that is already highly distrustful of the U.S. media that their views are not being dismissed by journalistic elites. If the rift between the populace at large and its sources of news information is to be repaired, it starts with gestures of mutual appreciation for different viewpoints.

This article was updated after publication.

Please note: This is a commentary piece. The views and opinions expressed within it are those of the author only and do not necessarily reflect the editorial opinion of IJR.

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