Notifications

Actress Rose McGowan’s Twitter account was temporarily suspended after the number one Harvey Weinstein antagonist reportedly tweeted a phone number that violated the social media giant’s terms of service.

Outrage was immediate.

McGowan went to her other social media sites on Facebook and Instagram.

On Instagram she posted the message Twitter sent her about her violation:

rosemcgowen/Instagram

She posted a screenshot of what Twitter sent her and then wrote:

TWITTER HAS SUSPENDED ME. THERE ARE POWERFUL FORCES AT WORK. BE MY VOICE. #ROSEARMY.

But the timing looked fishy. After all, she was going after some of the biggest names in Hollywood using Twitter.

Besides copious tweets about Weinstein and his brother, she told actor Ben Affleck to “f**k off” when he said he had no idea about Weinstein’s sexually predatory behavior:

She snorted, “I needed a laugh, thank you,” at a tweet by former Disney CEO Michael Eisner about why he fired the Weinstein brothers back in the day:

But as she continued to “slay dragons,” as she put it, the “coincidental” timing of her fulminations against the biggest names in Hollywood and subsequent silencing by Twitter didn’t go unnoticed by people.

Conservative author Ann Coulter weighed in:

This attorney said the move against McGowan was transparent:

Twitter user Brittany Pettibone thought it meant that Twitter was siding with the powerful Hollywood mogul:

Feminist Amy Siskind noted the suspension of McGowan’s Twitter account reminded her of something:

Joe Walsh apparently had UC Berkeley on his mind when he tweeted this:

John Nolte thought Twitter stopped McGowan because of money:

Some Twitter users wondered why addresses, photos, and other sensitive content could be tweeted but not the phone number McGowan gave out:

Chet Cannon had a similar question about Twitter’s “terms of service”:

Independent Journal Review asked the actress via Twitter whose number it was and received no response. Though Twitter says McGowan’s account has been restored after a 12-hour suspension, she hadn’t sent any messages on the social media platform before publication.

Some female Twitter users are calling for a boycott of the social media company Friday in solidarity with McGowan.

It’s not a trending topic on Twitter.