The International Women's Media Foundation's 27th Annual Courage In Journalism Awards Ceremony - Inside
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In November, eight women accused Charlie Rose of sexual harassment, including groping, inappropriate phone calls and walking around naked. CBS News President David Rhodes responded by firing Rose and issuing an internal statement, which stated:

A short time ago we terminated Charlie Rose’s employment with CBS News, effective immediately. This followed the revelation yesterday of extremely disturbing and intolerable behavior said to have revolved around his PBS program.

Despite Charlie’s important journalistic contribution to our news division, there is absolutely nothing more important, in this or any organization, than ensuring a safe, professional workplace — a supportive environment where people feel they can do their best work. We need to be such a place.

I’ve often heard that things used to be different. And no one may be able to correct the past. But what may once have been accepted should not ever have been acceptable.

CBS News has reported on extraordinary revelations at other media companies this year and last. Our credibility in that reporting requires credibility managing basic standards of behavior. That is why we have taken these actions.

Let’s please remember our obligations to each other as colleagues. We will have human resources support today and every day, and we are organizing more personal and direct training which you will hear about from senior management shortly.

I’m deeply disappointed and angry that people were victimized — and that even people not connected with these events could see their hard work undermined. If all of us commit to the best behavior and the best work — that is what we can be known for.

Rose was also fired by PBS, which stated:

We are immediately suspending distribution of “Charlie Rose.” PBS does not fund this nightly program or supervise its production, but we expect our producers to provide a workplace where people feel safe and are treated with dignity and respect. Charlie Rose is suspended immediately while we look into this matter. These allegations are extremely disturbing and we take them very seriously.

Rose said the allegations were inaccurate but still apologized for “inappropriate behavior.”

Now, PBS has announced who will replace Rose. Starting Dec. 11, Christiane Amanpour will be his interim replacement:

Neal Shapiro, the president and CEO of WNET, said:

“Christiane Amanpour is a fearless and uncompromising journalist. We are pleased to welcome her to the PBS system and are gratified to offer this thorough and responsible news program to viewers nationwide.”

PBS plans to announce one more host for a public affairs show but has not said who it will be.

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