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In a move sure to upset First Daughter and Alleged Voice for Women's Issues in the White House Ivanka Trump, the Trump administration has now nominated 42 people to fill the nation's U.S. attorney positions. Of those 42, a grand total of one is a woman.

Surely, Ivanka, champion of “Women Who Work,” purveyor of a federal paid family leave law that someone in Congress might take an interest in someday, and person who seriously suggested Planned Parenthood stop offering abortion-related services as a compromise to maintain its federal funding, is no doubt making her disappointment known to her father as we speak.

I eagerly await the leak to The New York Times or Vanity Fair confirming it.

Anyway, from BuzzFeed:

“It's a slap in the face,” said Joyce Vance, a former US attorney in Alabama who was one of Obama's early nominees in 2009, of Trump's decision to nominate predominantly men. “It's a statement that this is not a priority.”

Vance said that in not elevating women to these positions, the administration was starting a chain reaction that would keep women lawyers out of leadership posts in the future.

“US attorneys often become judges, partners in big law firms, even senators, and restricting women from advancing by excluding them from the US attorney positions is really a giant step backwards,” Vance said.

True. Chris Christie used his years as a U.S. attorney as a jumping-off point to run for governor of New Jersey, a gig that, among other things, offered him use of a sweet beach house.

Why is diversity important? This is why:

“When you're talking about the justice system — and with respect to US attorneys the criminal justice system in particular — having a more diverse set of US attorneys really helps instill greater confidence in the entire system. It is more reflective of the entire population,” Kang said. “It gives you a better sense that these are candidates being selected from the broadest and deepest pool of potential applicants.”

The Trump administration has been a giant step backward for gender and ethnic diversity in high-level government positions, no matter what Kellyanne Conway or Sarah Huckabee Sanders try to tell you.

Just this summer, Donald Trump gutted an Obama-era pay discrimination rule and funding for teenage pregnancy prevention programs, shut down the White House's Council on Women and Girls, and revealed it has a bigger gender pay gap than the Obama administration.

Oh, well. There are still 51 open U.S. attorney slots around the country that the White House needs to fill. Surely, Ivanka will make a pitch for some more diversity in the hiring, in between trips to North Dakota and interrupting high-level meetings.

Please note: This is a commentary piece. The views and opinions expressed within it are those of the author only and do not necessarily reflect the editorial opinion of IJR.