Trump's Reversal of Obama-Era War Tactics Results in Devastating Losses for ISIS

| DEC 27, 2017 | 3:12 PM

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images 

ISIS has lost 98 percent of its territory in Iraq and Syria with half of those losses coming during the 11 months President Donald Trump has been in office, according to Fox News.

The quick progress in the war against ISIS comes as President Trump reversed the rules of the Obama White House and allowed his military commanders more autonomy on the ground, giving them the authority to attack in real time.

According to the former head of U.S. Air Force intelligence, retired Air Force Lt. Gen. David Deptula, Obama's war strategy was cumbersome and put civilian lives in danger:

The rules of engagement under the Obama administration were onerous. I mean what are we doing having individual target determination being conducted in the White House, which in some cases adds weeks and weeks. The limitations that were put on actually resulted in greater civilian casualties.

“Micromanagement from Washington, DC, does not win battles,” President Trump said in August. “These killers need to know they have nowhere to hide, that no place is beyond the reach of American might and American arms. Retribution will be fast and powerful.”

The tally of ISIS fighters left in Iraq and Syria has fallen from a 2015 high of 45,000 fighters, to fewer than 1,000 today. “U.S. officials credit nearly 30,000 U.S.-led coalition airstrikes and regional partners on the ground for killing more than 70,000 jihadists,” reports Fox News.

ISIS used to hold territory the size of Ohio but has now been relegated to a small area along the Iraq and Syrian border.

“Deptula thinks the ISIS fight would have ended much sooner if then-President Obama had given his military commander in the field more authority,” according to Fox News. He compared Obama's strategy to Lyndon B. Johnson's in Vietnam.

“Obama was cautious, he was analytical, he always wanted to see all the sides of the story before he took any action — possibly to a fault,” David Rothkopf, the chief executive and editor of the Foreign Policy Group, told The New York Times in April.

“I think Trump is the opposite of all those things," he continued.