Cohen Slams Allegations He Visited Prague as 'Bad Information' — Says There's Proof He Wasn't There

| APR 15, 2018 | 5:12 PM
Michael Cohen

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President Donald Trump's personal attorney, Michael Cohen, rebuked a McClatchy DC report that there's evidence he traveled to Prague and claimed there's proof he was in Los Angeles at the time.

On Saturday, he tweeted, “Bad reporting, bad information, and bad story” in reference to the article by reporters Peter Stone and Greg Gordon.

“No matter how many times or ways they write it, I have never been to Prague,” he explained. “I was in L.A. with my son. Proven!”

Stone and Gordon reported in the article that two anonymous sources familiar with the matter told them that special counsel Robert Mueller has evidence that Cohen made a secret trip to Prague during the 2016 presidential campaign.

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The article stated, “Investigators have traced evidence that Cohen entered the Czech Republic through Germany,” and it acknowledged the attorney denies he's ever been to the Eastern European nation.

Cohen has repeatedly cited the lack of a Czech Republic stamp in his passport as proof he wasn't in Prague:

However, Gordon and Stone reported he wouldn't have needed a passport because both Germany and the Czech Republic are part of the Schengen Area and “operate with open borders.”

“Confirmation of the trip would lend credence to a retired British spy's report that Cohen strategized there with a powerful Kremlin figure about Russian meddling in the U.S. election,” the article stated in reference to the Christopher Steele dossier.

The McClatchy DC article also noted that even if there's evidence Cohen traveled to Prague, it's still unclear if Mueller has evidence that the lawyer met with any prominent Russians.

In January, Cohen filed a libel lawsuit against BuzzFeed for publishing the dossier, which ABC News reported he argued contained “false and defamatory” statements about him.

Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Texas) told MSNBC that if the evidence in the McClatchy article is true, it's a “big liability” for Cohen because he never told the House Intelligence Committee about his visit.

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“There is a legal liability for him if this is true,” he explained.

Castro added that if it's found that Cohen was dishonest about this, the entire story about possible collusion with Russia falls apart.

Stone and Gordon reported in their article that if Cohen met with Russians and hackers in Prague, as the dossier claims he did, it would possibly be the “most compelling evidence” of collusion.