Marine Veteran on Boy Scouts Decision: 'We Live in a Culture Where...You Can't Ask Little Boys to Be Masculine'

| MAY 3, 2018 | 5:18 PM
Johnny (Joey) Jones

While appearing on “Fox & Friends” on Thursday, Marine veteran Johnny Jones said what a lot of people were probably thinking after the Boy Scouts announced it would remove “boy” from its name.

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“We live in a culture where you can't ask kids to be tough. You can't ask little boys to be masculine,” Jones told Fox News' Brian Kilmeade.

Watch his interview below:

The organization's announcement followed its 2017 decision to allow girls to join their male counterparts.

“We believe it is critical to evolve how our programs meet the needs of families interested in positive and lifelong experiences for their children,” Boy Scouts Chief Executive Michael Surbaugh said.

But for Jones, the organization's attempt at neutrality was potentially harmful to young boys. Jones lamented how the culture considered using the term “boy” to be toxic and argued it was actually toxic for him not to teach his boy masculine traits.

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“To me, it's toxic to not teach my 9-year-old to be tough and not cry every time he gets hurt,” he said.

Jones added, however, that he thinks girls can participate in activities like sleeping outside. But he noted that “they also like to play dress-up and have time and do tea time.”

“It's not to say that little girls shouldn't have these opportunities,” he said after Kilmeade said that Girls Scouts still existed.

He added that he wasn't sure what society would gain if it continued to push against masculinity. He brought up how his father didn't cry when he was younger and indicated that was a good thing.

“I never saw my dad cry,” he said. "That wasn't necessarily a bad thing. When I was old enough to understand that he didn't have superhero powers then I learned he could cry and that was OK.

“But as a little boy, I needed to know my dad was that symbol of strength,” he added.

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