‘Plainly Against the Law’: Collins Slams Nadler’s ‘Widely Overbroad’ Subpoena of Mueller’s Unredacted Report

Joshua Roberts/Reuters

House of Representatives Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) issued a subpoena on Friday for the full, unredacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s long-awaited report, which has Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.) swiping back.

Not impressed by the Attorney General William Barr’s handling of the 448-page report, Nadler expressed his committee’s entitlement to the unredacted version — the report released to the public contained sections of blacked out information.

The Democratic representative is giving the Department of Justice until May 1 to comply by with the subpoena.

“I am open to working with the Department to reach a reasonable accommodation for access to these materials, however I cannot accept any proposal which leaves most of Congress in the dark, as they grapple with their duties of legislation, oversight and constitutional accountability,” Nadler wrote in a statement.

Collins, a ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee, slammed Nadler’s subpoena, which came “less than 24 hours after its release with minimal redactions,” for wanting information that “can’t be shared outside the Justice Department.”

The Republican congressman noted President Donald Trump did not use executive privilege — he previously roasted the stark contrast with the Obama administration’s use of executive privilege — to hold back information in the report.

As tensions escalate following Mueller’s report release, Collins said the committee’s subpoena to the Justice Department is “wildly overbroad” and commands records from the Justice Department, which would be “plainly against the law to share.”

He urged Nadler to “narrowly tailor his subpoena and give the department a meaningful chance to respond.”

“The return date on the subpoena is also sooner than the normal two weeks given to executive branch agencies. This is politically convenient for the chairman because the attorney general has offered to appear before our committee the following day, allowing the chairman to grandstand and rail against the attorney general for not cooperating on an impossible timeline.”

Barr is feeling the immense pressure from congressional Democrats but made clear at Thursday’s press conference that “these reports are not supposed to be made public,” as IJR News reported.

As IJR Red pointed out, Nadler sang a different tune in 1998 when former President Bill Clinton was under investigation, saying at that time the information “must be kept secret” and the redactions were necessary to protect the “privacy of third parties.”

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James
Member

Nadler is either ignorant of the Law; or just plain ignorant. Probably both since it was entirely different when Ken Starr’s report was completed and ready for review. Now that a Republican is involved, he wants to see everything (probably including the pens used to write the report and the chair Mueller sat on).

Phyllis Softa
Member

We know Whitewater & Russia Intervention investigations. Was Grand Jury info released with court approval on Starr investigation? YES. No court approval REQUESTED on the Mueller investigation. Were 12 redacted investigations open when Starr filed his report to Congress & public? NO. YES, with Mueller. Did Starr decline to make a decision on obstruction of justice? NO. Mueller indicated that 2 possibilities existed–CONGRESS can decide & charges can be pursued post office.

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