New Poll Reveals The Huge Gap in How Proud Republicans and Democrats Are of Their Country

| JUL 3, 2018 | 1:43 PM

According to a new poll, Democrats and Republicans differ on more than just their ideological views — they have vast differences in national pride.

Gallup reported on Monday that only 32 percent of Democrats were “extremely proud” of their country, well below the national but record-low of 47 percent among all Americans.

Republicans on the other hand continued their years-long trend of voicing greater national pride than Democrats but the disparity for 2018 was greater than in previous years.

Screenshot/Gallup

The bulk of Republicans — 74 percent — said they were “extremely proud” of their country. 

Democrats' 32 percent was a steep drop from the 56 percent they saw in 2013, after which their sense of national pride slowly decreased.

The steepest drop in recent years seemed to occur during President Donald Trump's first year in office. From 2017 to 2018, 11 percent less Democrats said they were “extremely proud” of their country.

When Gallup looked at pride according to ideology, it found even lower percentages among both political liberals and conservatives.

Screenshot/Gallup

While only 23 percent of political liberals said they were “extremely proud” of their country, 65 percent of political conservatives expressed that sentiment.

The poll came amid a national debate about whether the NFL should bar players from kneeling during the national anthem. While the White House has repeatedly portrayed the issue in terms of respecting the flag, others have argued the kneeling isn't a form of disrespect. Rather, they argued, it's a way of protesting police brutality and systemic racism.

According to Gallup's poll, white and nonwhite Americans also had substantially different views on national pride. Only 33 percent of nonwhite individuals said they were “extremely proud” of their country while 54 percent of white individuals said the same.

In previous years, the two diverged but not so dramatically. In 2013, for example, 61 percent of white individuals said they were “extremely proud” compared to 47 percent of nonwhite individuals who said the same.