Playboy CEO Explains Their Reasoning for No More Nudes

Playboy Magazine shocked the world last month when it was revealed that it would no longer feature fully nude women, a staple for the publication for more than 60 years.

Now, the CEO of the company, Scott Flanders, is speaking out about why they made that difficult decision.

He blames the move on the proliferation of pornography across the Internet.

Image Credit: Screenshot
Image Credit: Screenshot

Flanders spoke to CNN Money:

“After 62 years, Playboy is putting its clothes back on.”

“It served its purpose. When Hefner launched the magazine in 1953 nudity was provocative, and today it’s passe.”

He went on to explain how he feels our society’s interest in pornography has reached a critical mass, and that it is getting in the way of true intimacy:

“My personal view is that unfortunately availability of porn in some cases has substituted for intimacy in personal relationships.

“That is unfortunate and Playboy would like to be a bridge in the gap between sex, and understanding of sex between men and women.”

The decision was helped along by the extreme success of a Playboy-branded website that was deemed “safe-for-work.”

Traffic to the site spiked over 400 percent.

CEO Flanders has also noted that advertisers are lining up to be featured in the new, nudity-free iteration of the magazine:

“We’ve had brands talking to us and wanting to be in the March issue that haven’t advertised in Playboy for more than 20 years.”

But what about Hugh Hefner?

Image Credit: Wikimedia
Image Credit: Wikimedia

Was the 89-year-old founder of Playboy on board with the big change?

Flanders says that he was:

“We didn’t know how he would react for sure, and what we’ve seen is that he got it quickly.”

“This is a second opportunity for a first impression for our brand, and to make the brand more relevant to millennial males which was always his target audience.”

The format change will officially occur in March of next year.

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