Republican Senators Concerned With Setting Precedent for Dems Aim to Curb President’s Emergency Powers

Donald Trump
Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

Just a day ahead of the Senate voting on the resolution to block President Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration, Republican senators introduced a bill to allow Congress to end future national emergencies, but it wouldn’t affect Trump’s emergency declaration.

As IJR Red reported, Republican senators and the White House were scrambling to work out an agreement to amend the National Emergencies Act, hoping to deter some of the senators from voting against Trump’s border national emergency declaration.

Several Republicans have distanced themselves from Trump’s emergency declaration as they’re wary of the legal precedent it sets for future Democrat presidents.

Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.), however, seemed optimistic that amending the act could create different results in the Senate vote on the resolution as he believes “there’s a hope.”

Andrew Harrer-Pool/Getty Images

Later on Tuesday, however, over a dozen GOP lawmakers proposed a bill, led by Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah), that would require Congress to pass a resolution in order to keep a future national emergency continuing after 30 days, according to The Hill.

Republicans who are in support of the legislation — titled the Assuring that Robust, Thorough, and Informed Congressional Leadership is Exercised Over National Emergencies (Article One) Act — include Sens. Ted Cruz (Texas), Joni Ernst (Iowa), Mitt Romney (Utah), Thom Tillis (N.C.), Chuck Grassley (Iowa), and several others.

If Congress is troubled by recent emergency declarations made pursuant to the National Emergencies Act, they only have themselves to blame,” Lee said. He continued:

“Congress gave these legislative powers away in 1976 and it is far past time that we as an institution took them back. If we don’t want our president acting like a king we need to start taking back the legislative powers that allow him to do so.”

If the resolution to block Trump’s emergency declaration passes in the Senate on Thursday, the president previously told reporters he’d “one-hundred percent” veto it. It then likely wouldn’t have enough votes in the House or Senate to override the veto. President Trump has not yet weighed in on the new bill.

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