Democrats Led Republicans in Voter Enthusiasm Prior to Kavanaugh Hearing ㅡ That Lead Just Disappeared

Jeenah Moon/Reuters

It looks as though all of the controversies following the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court may have lit a match under Republican voters.

In July, the gap between Republican voter enthusiasm and Democratic enthusiasm was 10 points. Many conservatives were concerned that this could impact the 2018 midterm elections because the #Resistance was fired up and many right-leaning voters lacked enthusiasm.

That all changed in the past few weeks.

The poll conducted by NPR, PBS NewsHour, and Marist showed that Republican voter enthusiasm climbed 12 points.

The Democrats’ lead in voter enthusiasm over Republicans has diminished to just 2 percentage points, which NPR called “a statistical tie.”

Many are pointing to Kavanaugh’s nomination hearing as the reason many Republicans are more eager to vote in 2018. In fact, according to Pew Research Center, 65 percent of voters stated that Supreme Court appointments were “very important” to their vote in 2016.

Today, many Republicans believe that Democrats are working to delay Kavanaugh’s nomination until after the midterm elections in hopes that they can take over the Senate.

If they win the Senate, they would likely pull the same move that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) pulled with Judge Merrick Garland. Republican voters don’t want that to happen.

Many believe that Republican victories in 2018 depend on the approval of Kavanaugh:

Others couldn’t help but feel as though Democrats shot themselves in the foot by hyping up the Republican voter base through their perceived early delay tactics:

It is important to note that voter enthusiasm did increase for Democrats as well, though it was only by 4 percentage points.

Either way, both parties will likely use the confirmation, or lack thereof, as a key issue to rally voters in November.

It seems that the Supreme Cout has, yet again, become a top issue for voters.

What do you think?

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Kyle Throop
Member

This article is incorrect. It would not be “the same move that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) pulled with Judge Merrick Garland”. This is because at the time that Garland was not confirmed Obama was a lame duck President. If the Democrats were to deny Kav’s confirmation it would be against a sitting President with just as much chance if not more of being the President for an additional 4 years after winning the next presidential election. This is a huge difference.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

The dems definitely overplayed and “overacted” starting with “Spartacus” and “Shut up” Hinono and lets not forget Harris with her dramatics. Lest we forget Fienstein holding back info for almost 2 months that could have prevented this sideshow.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Even here in NYS where voting R is pretty much like spitting in the wind we have to get out and vote.

Screwtape
Member

Well, the all-out campaign against Kavanaugh certainly had unintended consequences for the Dims, didn’t it?

Otis
Member

Vote, vote, vote!

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