Russian Spokeswoman Tries to Rewrite History by Downplaying D-Day — Twitter Teaches Her a Lesson

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A spokeswoman for the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (RMFA) got a Twitter history lesson after she tried to rewrite history by downplaying the importance of the U.S. and the U.K. during the decisive D-Day landings that took place 75 years ago.

In a pair of tweets published Wednesday, Maria Zakharova — using the official RMFA Twitter account — falsely claimed that the Normandy landings during the D-Day invasion did not turn the tide of World War II, looking back on assertations by the Russian government that they suffered the heaviest of the casualties during the conflict.

The claims are very much in contrast with what most historians believe: that the D-Day invasions of Europe by the Allied Powers were critical in defeating Nazi Germany.

“The Normandy landings were not a game-changer for the outcome of WWII and the Great Patriotic War,” Zakharova wrote. “The outcome was determined by the Red Army’s victories – mainly, in Stalingrad and Kursk. For three years, the UK and then the US dragged out opening the second front.”

“Even if it was late, the opening of the second front was aimed at supporting Soviet troops in their combat missions,” the RMFA spokeswoman continued. “In fact, we ended up helping our Western allies who were defeated by the Nazis in the Ardennes. We hope our partners remember this.”

People did remember, indeed, calling out Zakharova for the revisionist history on Twitter and pointing out that the Russians had initially sided with Adolf Hitler and his regime.

The revisionist tweets came on the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasions on June 6, 1944, when the Allied Powers invaded the beaches of Normandy, France, to liberate them from Nazi control.

President Donald Trump and British Prime Minister Theresa May joined French President Emmanuel Macron in separate ceremonies along the Normandy coast, commemorating the anniversary of the critical move by the Allies.

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Michael Bryant
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Michael Bryant

Someone else in here brought up Operation Torch part of the North Africa campaign Nov 1942, followed by Operation Husky the Sicily campaign July-August 1943, Operation Avalanche the invasion of Italy Sep 1943, then the long slog to Monte Cassino by May 1944. Another event that gets overlooked is Operation Dragoon the Invasion of southern France Aug-Sep 1944. The Russians were begging for help early in the North Africa Campaign, asking for a second front!? NA was the “second front” followed by Italy, then Normandy, and sothern France. No to mention the allies were also involved in the Pacific. They… Read more »

Ryan Hoskins
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Ryan Hoskins

Don’t forget the American fight in Italy and Africa. 4 fronts if you count the Pacific?

Pat Warnock
Member

Russia helped by repelling the Nazi invasion but D-Day was the crux point that crushed the Nazis

MAGA
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MAGA

Yeah right. The russian’s are the best at everything in their minds. WW2 was won by them as they see it. The citizens of russia were sacrificed by their government.

Glenn Botts
Member

How many of the Russia causalities were wounded by Soviet soldiers? The Soviets would barely arm their soldiers and order them to attack with Soviet machine guns at the ready for anyone that retreated. The second and third waves were supposed to pick up the guns of the those killed in front on them.
The Soviets cleared mine fields by having the soldiers link arms and march through the mine field. Dead soldiers were easily replaced, so they were disposable.

Toni
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Toni

I’m impressed that the Tweet replies were so accurate in their historical accounts!! Indeed, if Hitler hadn’t been so busy on so many fronts, Russian might indeed have fallen. Not only that, but Russia had its own murderous purge of Jewish peoples, which was right in line with Hitler’s goals. They would never have entered the war if Hitler hadn’t betrayed their alliance & attacked them. But then Russia has never been much for correct historical accounts, especially if they weren’t positive reflections of their “fearless” dictators!

David Davenport
Member

Zakharova couldn’t be more wrong. The Allies opened the “second front” with Operation Torch in North Africa in November, 1942, and followed this with the invasions of Sicily and mainland Italy in July 1943. Hitler was compelled to reinforce the “underbelly” of Europe with dozens of Divisions that would have been deployed to the Russian front against an Army that was largely supplied by the United States. These diverted German forces would have been decisive is crushing the Red Army. Moreover, Operation Overlord (D-Day at Normandy) was successful, not because the Red Army was an “awesome fighting machine” that kept… Read more »

Craig
Member

Without doubt, the prolonged Battle of Stalingrad and the Battle of Kursk, the last being largest armored battle in history, were monumental Russian victories, but I have never heard anyone downplay the bravery and determination of Russian soldiers or suggest that they weren’t extremely important in the ultimate victory over the Nazis. However, no two nations in history have been so equipped to assemble and launch an armada of 5,000 ships than were the Americans and the British. To do that through perilous seas and then push wave after wave of men and materiel against Hitler’s Fortress Europe is staggering… Read more »

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