Trump Honors Longest-Serving Congressman John Dingell After His Passing: ‘A Highly Respected Man’

Chris Kleponis/Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images

On Friday, President Donald Trump joined the nation in mourning the loss of America’s longest-serving congressman, Rep. John Dingell (D-Mich.), who passed away on Thursday night.

In a statement issued to IJR by the White House, the president ordered the flag of the United States be lowered to half-mast in Dingell’s honor:

“As a mark of respect for the memory and longstanding service of former Representative John David Dingell, Jr., of Michigan — the longest-serving Member of Congress in our Nation’s history — I hereby order, by the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, that the flag of the United States shall be flown at half-staff at the White House and upon all public buildings and grounds, at all military posts and naval stations, and on all naval vessels of the Federal Government in the District of Columbia and throughout the United States and its Territories and possessions until sunset, February 9, 2019.”

Watch:

President Trump also shared his condolences with Dingell’s wife in a touching tweet paying tribute to his service.

“Deepest sympathies to Congresswoman Debbie Dingell and the entire family of John Dingell,” he wrote. “Longest serving Congressman in Country’s history which, if people understand politics, means he was very smart. A great reputation and highly respected man.”

The president’s heartfelt message comes after his predecessor former President Barack Obama also honored the late congressman.

As IJR Blue reported, Obama remembered Dingell, who served alongside him during his presidency, on Friday:

“He had a long tradition of introducing legislation on the first day of each new Congress to guarantee health care for every single American. Because of him, we’ve come closer to that vision than ever before. And when we finally achieve it — and we will — we’ll all owe him our gratitude. Michelle and I send our warmest sympathies to Debbie, the entire Dingell family, and all the Michiganders and Americans whose lives are better because of his lifetime of service.”

Dingell passed away peacefully at the age of 92 on Thursday in his home in Michigan.

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WellHungChad
Member

….And to think I missed his viewing! I may have made more of an effort to attend if I thought I could piss on his corpse and get away with it!!

At least the old f*ck told the truth ONCE: “It will take some time for Obamacare to control the people.”

This old ass inherited his position from his father who in turn, relinquished it to his wife! Which tells you how mind numbed his district is!!!

Phyllis Softa
Member

Many districts produce head scratching election results. John Boehner called a member of his caucus “a legislative terrorist.” But Ohio 4th district re-elected Jim Jordan for a 7th term. CA 50th returned Duncan Hunter for a 6th term AFTER federally indicted on 60 counts. Chris Collins was indicted on multiple charges before NY 27th sent him for a 4th term. Steve King, a decades known racist, is serving a 9th term. In Dingle’s 50 years of service, NO INDICTMENTS or ethics inquiries.

Morte206
Member

Term limits seem more and more reasonable every day.

Rocky Drummond
Member

Resolve the issue of money in politics and it won’t matter so much. Really.

Corruption is much more prevalent, corrosive and dangerous than a long tenure because, without it, it will be much more likely that the Congressperson will be elected legitimately and will work for the voters, not the donors.

WellHungChad
Member

Rocky, a corrupt politician’s tenure only has to be as long as it takes for them to make the right contacts with lobbyists with pockets deep enough to enrich them. I agree with you on money and politics but time is also a variable in the corruption equation.

Rocky Drummond
Member

If voters are the only ones allowed to donate to politicians, they can change their vote if a politician doesn’t live up to their promises. The politician ends her/his own term if s/he fails.

WellHungChad
Member

Come to think of it, Rocky, while you and I are WORLDS apart on the practicality of universal health care, I’m with you on getting rid of money in politics. However, since the politicians (who are also lawmakers) make the rules, I don’t see it happening anytime soon!

Rocky Drummond
Member

It’s happening right now! It’s a slow-roll, but a whole bunch of new candidates just got elected partly because they refused to take corporate or other big money. In 2020, expect a whole bunch more of them to be elected.

The only precondition of any Justice Democrat candidate is that they don’t take any big donor money. Their average donation was $15.13 in the 2018 cycle, and I believe that there are 12 JDs in Congress, now.

This change is happening now.

Rocky Drummond
Member

The point is that JDs represent their donors – their constituents. Not like the corporate Ds or Rs who represent only their lobbyist or wealthy donors.

Phyllis Softa
Member

Let’s work on getting dark money out of politics. I am okay with AARP openly lobbying for retirees and labor unions openly lobbying for the American worker, so I have to accept the NRA openly lobbying for gun violence and Big Oil openly lobbying for no action on global warming. I would rather see our lawmakers concentrate on eliminating the dark money.

Rocky Drummond
Member

You have to shoot high if you want to accomplish anything regarding the total amount of corruption. Lobbyists will still exist. It’s just that they will have less influence. There is a PAC working to get money out of politics (ironic) called WOLF-PAC. It will be a long struggle, but a new state should join this month.

However, Common Cause fights anyone who tries to do anything that upsets established corruption.

Full control of the hill will help, for sure.

Phyllis Softa
Member

So does campaign finance reform, but neither is going to get passed by Congress. So if VOTERS want term limits, they need to remember that when they cast THEIR ballot.

Rocky Drummond
Member

Who can successfully campaign for term limits?

Phyllis Softa
Member

Hey, I can think of numerous politicians that campaigned for 8 yrs of repealing Obamacare. If the voters don’t ask where the votes are to get it passed Congress and in the case of 2010 and 2014 campaigns, where are the votes to override a veto, THAT was on the gullible voters. If someone wants to campaign on term limits, they need to share the list of legislators that will vote for term limits. Always learn from the mistakes of others, it is not necessary to repeat them.

KhyberRifle
Member

Where’d you go M’Luv? Miss your thoughtful and pithy posts. I was once OnceUponATime in the previous IJR lifetime so we’ve met on these Streets of Fire (Street of Philadelphia?)

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