Protesters Interrupt Bloomberg’s Fox News Town Hall As They Call on Him to ‘Release the NDAs’

Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg was interrupted by protesters during a town hall hosted by Fox News on Monday evening.

After the former New York City mayor responded to a question from the audience on guns, protesters demanded Bloomberg “release the NDAs.” They also shouted, “Stop and frisk is wrong!”

Fox News cut to a commercial break as protesters stood up holding signs protesting Bloomberg. One man that stood up said, “You guys, we don’t protest, we don’t do that.”

After the break, Fox News hosts Bret Baier and Martha MacCallum addressed the brief protests.

MacCallum said, “We’ve asked everybody to just really respect each other, allow everyone to ask their questions and have a civil conversation.”

Watch the video of the protest below.

Bloomberg has recently come under scrutiny by his Democratic challengers over his alleged inappropriate behavior toward women as well as using non-disclosure agreements (NDA).

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) opened her CNN town hall on Feb. 20 by reading aloud a document to release people from his NDAs. Bloomberg recently stated he will allow his company to release three women from NDAs after initially resisting to do so at a Democratic debate.

“If any of them want to be released from their NDA so that they can talk about those allegations, they should contact the company and they’ll be given a release,” Bloomberg said in the statement. “It is imperative that when problems occur, workplaces not only address the specific incidents, but the culture and practices that led to those incidents. And then leaders must act.”

The billionaire is set to go on the ballot for the first time during Super Tuesday seeking to make Trump “a one-term president.”

Sanders is currently the front-runner nationally with Biden trailing behind in second, Bloomberg currently takes the third spot with Warren taking the fourth in the polls as IJR has previously reported. Voters across fourteen states are set to head to the polls.